Goodbye, July! Hello, August!

Good afternoon, Foothills Weather Nation! Happy Sunday! We hope everyone has enjoyed their week. I don't know about anyone else, but the end of July has come in quicker than expected. With only 3 calendar days left to go we are quickly approaching the busy month of August which brings the last big beach weekend of the year, the start of academic year, as well as the ramping up our hurricane season.


What weather differences can we expect moving into August? For this we will share what is typical for July and August and discuss how the weather patterns have been and look to go based off of long range predictions.


July:

Average Daily High Temp: 88 degrees F

Average Daily Low Temp: 67 degrees F

Average precipitation per month: between 4.45 inches and 4.85 inches


August:

Average Daily High Temp: 86 degrees F

Average Daily Low Temp: 65 degrees F

Average precipitation per month: between 4.45 inches and 4.58 inches


How did our July compare? Our daily high and low thus far has been a degree or so above average across the region. Rainfall has exceeded the average by a solid 2 inches thus far with one extra day of rainfall we can expect before the month is done.


What does August look like for us? Long range models are suggesting August to be between 40 and 50% more likely to be above average, but is showing equal chances to have above average rainfall as it does to below average rainfall.


Earlier we mentioned the hurricane season and how it begins to ramp up in activity in August. Of course, it is unrealistic to make any predictions on the kinds of impacts tropical disturbances and systems will make specifically to the Foothills before they exist, but we can say that NOAA's prediction for the 2019 Atlantic Hurricane Season reflects to be near normal with 9 to 15 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 4 to 8 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 2 to 4 major hurricanes (category 3, 4 or 5; with winds of 111 mph or higher). NOAA provides these ranges with a 70% confidence. An average hurricane season produces 12 named storms, of which 6 become hurricanes, including 3 major hurricanes.


There is relevance in bringing this topic up as the NHC has issued a Tropical Weather Outlook at 1:37 pm today for what they are calling Disturbance 1.




"200 PM EDT Sun Jul 28 2019


For the North Atlantic...Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico:


1. A persistent area of cloudiness and thunderstorms located over the

eastern Caribbean Sea is associated with a tropical wave. This

disturbance is expected to move west-northwestward to northwestward

across the north-central Caribbean Sea during the next few days,

producing locally heavy rainfall and possibly some flooding across

Puerto Rico and Hispaniola. Little development of the disturbance is

expected due to interaction with land. However, the system is

forecast to emerge over the Straits of Florida by the end of the

week where environmental conditions could be a little more conducive

for development to occur.

* Formation chance through 48 hours...low...10 percent.

* Formation chance through 5 days...low...20 percent."


Different models are projecting a semi clear and even split of this disturbance moving either further west into the Gulf or more northwest towards the eastern coastline of Florida in the next 100 hours or a little over 4 days. This, of course, could potentially impact local weather should it make it far enough inland which is always proves as a fair game option for this time of year.


But let's not get too far ahead of ourselves- we would like to give you more immediate predictions as these have more immediate impacts. To save everyone's time as this has been a lengthy discussion, we will try to keep this significantly shorter and to the point for our look at the week ahead.


First, it's important to note a recent Air Quality Alert that was issued by the NWS for our area:

344 PM EDT SUN JUL 28 2019


...AIR QUALITY ALERT IN EFFECT UNTIL 8 PM EDT THIS EVENING...

...AIR QUALITY ALERT IN EFFECT FROM 10 AM TO 8 PM EDT MONDAY...


THE NORTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY IN RALEIGH NC

HAS ISSUED A CODE ORANGE AIR QUALITY ACTION DAY FOR GROUND LEVEL

OZONE FOR THE CHARLOTTE AREA, UNTIL 8 PM EDT THIS EVENING. A CODE

ORANGE AIR QUALITY ACTION DAY WILL BE IN EFFECT MONDAY FROM 10 AM TO

8 PM.


AN AIR QUALITY ACTION DAY MEANS THAT GROUND LEVEL OZONE

CONCENTRATIONS WITHIN THE REGION MAY APPROACH OR EXCEED UNHEALTHY

STANDARDS. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT THE NORTH

CAROLINA DIVISION OF AIR QUALITY WEB SITE AT

HTTPS://XAPPS.NCDENR.ORG/AQ/FORECASTCENTERENVISTA.


Pardon Monday, the bulk of our week shows between a 30-50% chance of rain and thunderstorms each day with the main threats being in the afternoon as seasonally expected. Daily highs will be warmer at the start of our week with temperatures hovering near 90 degrees and in the mid 80's by the end of the week. Nightly lows will be fairly consistent in being in the mid to upper 60's. For those who are looking to spend time outdoors, keep an eye out for our weather updates.


Thank you very much for reading! I hope everyone has a great end to their July and a fantastic start to August.


Until next time!

23 views

2020 FOOTHILLS ACTION  NETWORK ALL RIGHTS RESERVED                                                             OFFICE:    828-604-0435

632 COLLEGE DRIVE MARION NC 28752                                                                                                  PO BOX 8218 MORGANTON NC 28680