Another front to deliver cold air into the region this weekend, frost likely by Monday...

Submitted by: Daniel Crawley


The weather across the Western Carolinas on Thursday had that classic fall feel, cool crisp mornings with mild afternoons…

 

 

Friday will be just a tad warmer ahead of a frontal boundary.  It’s the weather behind this front, slated to pass through on Saturday that is going to deliver an even colder blast to the region and the likelihood of the first frost to the region…

 

 

 

Speaking of frost, here is a listing of towns and cities across North Carolina and their average first frost. For those outside of the mountains, any potential frost this weekend will actually occur close to the normal date in which a frost takes place.. Its in the mountains where things are running behind schedule…

 

 

Average First Frost Date.png



 

 

 

By Saturday evening, high pressure over the Plains will usher in this new polar airmass. Northwest winds will begin to howl, especially late in the day.. In our mountainous sections of the FWN coverage area, winds could gust up to 30+ mph by late Saturday afternoon with 20+ mph gusts expected in the lower elevations.

 


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This ushers in the first chance of frost across the Foothills on Saturday night as the cold air will be advected in. It will be the winds that will ultimately determine where frost formation occurs. By sunrise Sunday expect mid to upper 30’s along and north of Interstate 40 with upper 30’s to low 40’s near US 74.

 


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And believe it or not for our friends in the North Carolina High Country…just enough moisture and cold air interacts to bring a brief shot of snow flurries/showers on Saturday night. Elevations above 4000 ft stand the best chance of seeing a few flurries and the very high peaks (Sugar, Beech, Grandfather) might squeeze out just enough moisture for a trace of snow.

 

 


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Sunday is going to be a cold day across the region, (40’s High Country, low 50’s Central Mountains, 50’s to low 60’s in the Foothills/Piedmont) as high pressure quickly slides through the Ohio Valley toward the Carolinas…and by Monday morning high pressure will be overhead Central North Carolina delivering what could be even colder air further east…most of the state West of I-95 could see 30’s Monday morning.

 

 

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So…be prepared for what looks to be a chilly second half to the weekend!

























Wednesday Futurecast: Cooler and much drier air moving in today...

Submitted by: Daniel Crawley



Good Wednesday morning to everyone, another surge of autumn-like weather is coming in today as the region will dry out from a soggy Tuesday afternoon and evening…


As you can see on the water vapor we have southwest winds at the jet stream level streaming clouds across the Southeast US. This will help keep areas roughly south of Interstate 20 warm and fairly humid…meanwhile here in North Carolina a surface boundary has moved in and will slide through bringing more refreshing weather today.


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FUTURECAST



9 am


As you can see, drier air is already pushing into the Western Carolinas helping dissolve any fog that might develop during the pre-daylight hours…

 9 am Future Radar

9 am Future Radar

9 am Dewpoints






1 pm


High pressure to the west is moving in our direction, sunshine should be abundant with increasing northwest winds…


 1 pm Future Radar

1 pm Future Radar

 1 pm Dewpoints

1 pm Dewpoints




5 pm


Mostly sunny skies, breezy northwest winds and low humidity will yield a beautiful late afternoon, with temps close to 70 degrees…

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These conditions will help set the stage for a cool and crisp evening as temps will drop off pretty quick after sunset and ultimately heading for the 40’s by first thing Thursday morning…


The Week Ahead 10/15-10/21 Seasonably cool and rainy

Good evening, Foothills Weather Nation! We are moving into mid October, which looks to be pretty seasonal with respects to temperatures and the flux of warm and cold fronts. Our forecast will be written in three parts to address the three main weather events going into this week.

Near term forecast (Monday-Tuesday)

A warm front and a quickly following cold front associated with a Canadian low pressure center dominates this area of the forecast. The warm front will keep things on the milder side with temperatures in the upper 70’s on Monday and low 70’s on Tuesday, partly cloudy conditions with a gradual increase in precipitation probabilities from Monday night (20%) on through Tuesday (50%) as the cold front closes in. Expect the nightly lows to dip into the low 60’s and upper 50’s respectively. Winds during this time will start out from the southwest with the warm front to the northeast with the cold front, both days at 5-10 mph.

Short term forecast (Wednesday-Friday day)

There is the lingering chance of precipitation (20%) following the cold front in the overnight hours from Tuesday into Wednesday. Otherwise, Wednesday through Friday day is generally cooler with mostly sunny conditions as a high pressure holds strong over the region. Expect diurnal highs in the upper 60s to low 60’s with nightly lows in the mid 40’s. Winds during this time will remain mild with average wind speeds around 5 mph from the north.

Long term forecast ( Friday night - Sunday)

Going into Friday night is when we see the procession of yet another cold front that looks to be more robust. This front could arrive as early as Friday evening with the bulk of the event occurring on Saturday. Precipitation probabilities start low (20%) and ramp up to 50% on Saturday. By Sunday things will have blown themselves out, leaving the ever familiar end of October chilliness. Temperatures will be in the mid 60’s for the daily highs on Friday and Saturday and in the upper 50’s on Sunday. Nightly lows will be in the low 50’s, upper 40’s, and upper 30’s respectively. This will make for a cold start to the work week next week.

Thanks for reading. We hope you have a wonderful week!

Tropical Storm Warning Breakdown By County

IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER THIS IS THE WAY IT CAME FROM THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

_______________________________________________________________________________

CATAWBA COUNTY:

..TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS TROPICAL STORM-FORCE WINDS ARE 
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - HICKORY
    - NEWTON

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: BELOW TROPICAL STORM FORCE WIND
        - PEAK WIND FORECAST: 10-20 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 35 MPH

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR WIND 39 TO 
      57 MPH
        - THE WIND THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS WIND OF EQUIVALENT TROPICAL STORM 
          FORCE DUE TO POSSIBLE FORECAST CHANGES IN TRACK, SIZE, OR 
          INTENSITY.
        - PREPARE: EFFORTS TO PROTECT PROPERTY SHOULD NOW BE 
          UNDERWAY. PREPARE FOR LIMITED WIND DAMAGE.
        - ACT: ACT NOW TO COMPLETE PREPARATIONS BEFORE THE WIND 
          BECOMES HAZARDOUS.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LIMITED
        - DAMAGE TO PORCHES, AWNINGS, CARPORTS, SHEDS, AND UNANCHORED 
          MOBILE HOMES. UNSECURED LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS BLOWN ABOUT.
        - MANY LARGE TREE LIMBS BROKEN OFF. A FEW TREES SNAPPED OR 
          UPROOTED, BUT WITH GREATER NUMBERS IN PLACES WHERE TREES 
          ARE SHALLOW ROOTED. SOME FENCES AND ROADWAY SIGNS BLOWN 
          OVER.
        - A FEW ROADS IMPASSABLE FROM DEBRIS, PARTICULARLY WITHIN 
          URBAN OR HEAVILY WOODED PLACES. HAZARDOUS DRIVING 
          CONDITIONS ON BRIDGES AND OTHER ELEVATED ROADWAYS.
        - SCATTERED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS IN EFFECT
        - PEAK RAINFALL AMOUNTS: ADDITIONAL 3-6 INCHES, WITH LOCALLY 
          HIGHER AMOUNTS

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR MAJOR 
      FLOODING RAIN
        - THE FLOODING RAIN THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM 
          THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: EMERGENCY PLANS SHOULD INCLUDE THE POTENTIAL FOR 
          MAJOR FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAIN. EVACUATIONS AND RESCUES ARE 
          LIKELY.
        - PREPARE: STRONGLY CONSIDER PROTECTIVE ACTIONS, ESPECIALLY 
          IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA VULNERABLE TO FLOODING.
        - ACT: HEED ANY FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS. FAILURE TO TAKE 
          ACTION WILL LIKELY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: EXTENSIVE
        - MAJOR RAINFALL FLOODING MAY PROMPT MANY EVACUATIONS AND 
          RESCUES.
        - RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES MAY RAPIDLY OVERFLOW THEIR BANKS IN 
          MULTIPLE PLACES. SMALL STREAMS, CREEKS, CANALS, ARROYOS, 
          AND DITCHES MAY BECOME DANGEROUS RIVERS. IN MOUNTAIN AREAS, 
          DESTRUCTIVE RUNOFF MAY RUN QUICKLY DOWN VALLEYS WHILE 
          INCREASING SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ROCKSLIDES AND MUDSLIDES. 
          FLOOD CONTROL SYSTEMS AND BARRIERS MAY BECOME STRESSED.
        - FLOOD WATERS CAN ENTER MANY STRUCTURES WITHIN MULTIPLE 
          COMMUNITIES, SOME STRUCTURES BECOMING UNINHABITABLE OR 
          WASHED AWAY. MANY PLACES WHERE FLOOD WATERS MAY COVER 
          ESCAPE ROUTES. STREETS AND PARKING LOTS BECOME RIVERS OF 
          MOVING WATER WITH UNDERPASSES SUBMERGED. DRIVING CONDITIONS 
          BECOME DANGEROUS. MANY ROAD AND BRIDGE CLOSURES WITH SOME 
          WEAKENED OR WASHED OUT.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: 
        - SITUATION IS UNFAVORABLE FOR TORNADOES

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: TORNADOES NOT EXPECTED
        - THE TORNADO THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: TORNADOES ARE NOT EXPECTED. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS 
          WITH GUSTY WINDS MAY STILL OCCUR.
        - PREPARE: LITTLE TO NO PREPARATIONS NEEDED TO PROTECT 
          AGAINST TORNADOES AT THIS TIME. KEEP INFORMED OF THE LATEST 
          TORNADO SITUATION.
        - ACT: LISTEN FOR CHANGES IN THE FORECAST.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LITTLE TO NONE
        - LITTLE TO NO POTENTIAL IMPACTS FROM TORNADOES.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION:
    - HTTPS://READYNC.ORG
__________________________________________________________________________________

ALEXANDER COUNTY

...TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS TROPICAL STORM-FORCE WINDS ARE 
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - TAYLORSVILLE

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: BELOW TROPICAL STORM FORCE WIND
        - PEAK WIND FORECAST: 10-20 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 30 MPH

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR WIND 39 TO 
      57 MPH
        - THE WIND THREAT HAS INCREASED FROM THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS WIND OF EQUIVALENT TROPICAL STORM 
          FORCE DUE TO POSSIBLE FORECAST CHANGES IN TRACK, SIZE, OR 
          INTENSITY.
        - PREPARE: EFFORTS TO PROTECT PROPERTY SHOULD NOW BE 
          UNDERWAY. PREPARE FOR LIMITED WIND DAMAGE.
        - ACT: ACT NOW TO COMPLETE PREPARATIONS BEFORE THE WIND 
          BECOMES HAZARDOUS.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LIMITED
        - DAMAGE TO PORCHES, AWNINGS, CARPORTS, SHEDS, AND UNANCHORED 
          MOBILE HOMES. UNSECURED LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS BLOWN ABOUT.
        - MANY LARGE TREE LIMBS BROKEN OFF. A FEW TREES SNAPPED OR 
          UPROOTED, BUT WITH GREATER NUMBERS IN PLACES WHERE TREES 
          ARE SHALLOW ROOTED. SOME FENCES AND ROADWAY SIGNS BLOWN 
          OVER.
        - A FEW ROADS IMPASSABLE FROM DEBRIS, PARTICULARLY WITHIN 
          URBAN OR HEAVILY WOODED PLACES. HAZARDOUS DRIVING 
          CONDITIONS ON BRIDGES AND OTHER ELEVATED ROADWAYS.
        - SCATTERED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS IN EFFECT
        - PEAK RAINFALL AMOUNTS: ADDITIONAL 2-4 INCHES, WITH LOCALLY 
          HIGHER AMOUNTS

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR MODERATE 
      FLOODING RAIN
        - THE FLOODING RAIN THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM 
          THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: EMERGENCY PLANS SHOULD INCLUDE THE POTENTIAL FOR 
          MODERATE FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAIN. EVACUATIONS AND RESCUES 
          ARE POSSIBLE.
        - PREPARE: CONSIDER PROTECTIVE ACTIONS IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA 
          VULNERABLE TO FLOODING.
        - ACT: HEED ANY FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS. FAILURE TO TAKE 
          ACTION MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE. 

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: SIGNIFICANT
        - MODERATE RAINFALL FLOODING MAY PROMPT SEVERAL EVACUATIONS 
          AND RESCUES.
        - RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES MAY QUICKLY BECOME SWOLLEN WITH 
          SWIFTER CURRENTS AND OVERSPILL THEIR BANKS IN A FEW PLACES, 
          ESPECIALLY IN USUALLY VULNERABLE SPOTS. SMALL STREAMS, 
          CREEKS, CANALS, ARROYOS, AND DITCHES OVERFLOW.
        - FLOOD WATERS CAN ENTER SOME STRUCTURES OR WEAKEN 
          FOUNDATIONS. SEVERAL PLACES MAY EXPERIENCE EXPANDED AREAS 
          OF RAPID INUNDATION AT UNDERPASSES, LOW-LYING SPOTS, AND 
          POOR DRAINAGE AREAS. SOME STREETS AND PARKING LOTS TAKE ON 
          MOVING WATER AS STORM DRAINS AND RETENTION PONDS OVERFLOW. 
          DRIVING CONDITIONS BECOME HAZARDOUS. SOME ROAD AND BRIDGE 
          CLOSURES.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: 
        - SITUATION IS UNFAVORABLE FOR TORNADOES

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: TORNADOES NOT EXPECTED
        - THE TORNADO THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: TORNADOES ARE NOT EXPECTED. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS 
          WITH GUSTY WINDS MAY STILL OCCUR.
        - PREPARE: LITTLE TO NO PREPARATIONS NEEDED TO PROTECT 
          AGAINST TORNADOES AT THIS TIME. KEEP INFORMED OF THE LATEST 
          TORNADO SITUATION.
        - ACT: LISTEN FOR CHANGES IN THE FORECAST.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LITTLE TO NONE
        - LITTLE TO NO POTENTIAL IMPACTS FROM TORNADOES.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION:
    - HTTPS://READYNC.ORG
______________________________________________________________________________________

MOUNTAINS OF BURKE COUNTY

...TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS TROPICAL STORM-FORCE WINDS ARE 
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - JONAS RIDGE

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: BELOW TROPICAL STORM FORCE WIND
        - PEAK WIND FORECAST: 15-25 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 40 MPH

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR WIND 39 TO 
      57 MPH
        - THE WIND THREAT HAS INCREASED FROM THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS WIND OF EQUIVALENT TROPICAL STORM 
          FORCE DUE TO POSSIBLE FORECAST CHANGES IN TRACK, SIZE, OR 
          INTENSITY.
        - PREPARE: EFFORTS TO PROTECT PROPERTY SHOULD NOW BE 
          UNDERWAY. PREPARE FOR LIMITED WIND DAMAGE.
        - ACT: ACT NOW TO COMPLETE PREPARATIONS BEFORE THE WIND 
          BECOMES HAZARDOUS.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LIMITED
        - DAMAGE TO PORCHES, AWNINGS, CARPORTS, SHEDS, AND UNANCHORED 
          MOBILE HOMES. UNSECURED LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS BLOWN ABOUT.
        - MANY LARGE TREE LIMBS BROKEN OFF. A FEW TREES SNAPPED OR 
          UPROOTED, BUT WITH GREATER NUMBERS IN PLACES WHERE TREES 
          ARE SHALLOW ROOTED. SOME FENCES AND ROADWAY SIGNS BLOWN 
          OVER.
        - A FEW ROADS IMPASSABLE FROM DEBRIS, PARTICULARLY WITHIN 
          URBAN OR HEAVILY WOODED PLACES. HAZARDOUS DRIVING 
          CONDITIONS ON BRIDGES AND OTHER ELEVATED ROADWAYS.
        - SCATTERED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS IN EFFECT
        - PEAK RAINFALL AMOUNTS: ADDITIONAL 1-3 INCHES, WITH LOCALLY 
          HIGHER AMOUNTS

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR MODERATE 
      FLOODING RAIN
        - THE FLOODING RAIN THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM 
          THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: EMERGENCY PLANS SHOULD INCLUDE THE POTENTIAL FOR 
          MODERATE FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAIN. EVACUATIONS AND RESCUES 
          ARE POSSIBLE.
        - PREPARE: CONSIDER PROTECTIVE ACTIONS IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA 
          VULNERABLE TO FLOODING.
        - ACT: HEED ANY FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS. FAILURE TO TAKE 
          ACTION MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE. 

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: SIGNIFICANT
        - MODERATE RAINFALL FLOODING MAY PROMPT SEVERAL EVACUATIONS 
          AND RESCUES.
        - RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES MAY QUICKLY BECOME SWOLLEN WITH 
          SWIFTER CURRENTS AND OVERSPILL THEIR BANKS IN A FEW PLACES, 
          ESPECIALLY IN USUALLY VULNERABLE SPOTS. SMALL STREAMS, 
          CREEKS, CANALS, ARROYOS, AND DITCHES OVERFLOW.
        - FLOOD WATERS CAN ENTER SOME STRUCTURES OR WEAKEN 
          FOUNDATIONS. SEVERAL PLACES MAY EXPERIENCE EXPANDED AREAS 
          OF RAPID INUNDATION AT UNDERPASSES, LOW-LYING SPOTS, AND 
          POOR DRAINAGE AREAS. SOME STREETS AND PARKING LOTS TAKE ON 
          MOVING WATER AS STORM DRAINS AND RETENTION PONDS OVERFLOW. 
          DRIVING CONDITIONS BECOME HAZARDOUS. SOME ROAD AND BRIDGE 
          CLOSURES.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: 
        - SITUATION IS UNFAVORABLE FOR TORNADOES

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: TORNADOES NOT EXPECTED
        - THE TORNADO THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: TORNADOES ARE NOT EXPECTED. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS 
          WITH GUSTY WINDS MAY STILL OCCUR.
        - PREPARE: LITTLE TO NO PREPARATIONS NEEDED TO PROTECT 
          AGAINST TORNADOES AT THIS TIME. KEEP INFORMED OF THE LATEST 
          TORNADO SITUATION.
        - ACT: LISTEN FOR CHANGES IN THE FORECAST.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LITTLE TO NONE
        - LITTLE TO NO POTENTIAL IMPACTS FROM TORNADOES.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION:
    - HTTPS://READYNC.ORG
___________________________________________________________________________________

GREATER CALDWELL COUNTY

...TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS TROPICAL STORM-FORCE WINDS ARE 
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - LENOIR

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: BELOW TROPICAL STORM FORCE WIND
        - PEAK WIND FORECAST: 10-20 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 30 MPH

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR WIND 39 TO 
      57 MPH
        - THE WIND THREAT HAS INCREASED FROM THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS WIND OF EQUIVALENT TROPICAL STORM 
          FORCE DUE TO POSSIBLE FORECAST CHANGES IN TRACK, SIZE, OR 
          INTENSITY.
        - PREPARE: EFFORTS TO PROTECT PROPERTY SHOULD NOW BE 
          UNDERWAY. PREPARE FOR LIMITED WIND DAMAGE.
        - ACT: ACT NOW TO COMPLETE PREPARATIONS BEFORE THE WIND 
          BECOMES HAZARDOUS.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LIMITED
        - DAMAGE TO PORCHES, AWNINGS, CARPORTS, SHEDS, AND UNANCHORED 
          MOBILE HOMES. UNSECURED LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS BLOWN ABOUT.
        - MANY LARGE TREE LIMBS BROKEN OFF. A FEW TREES SNAPPED OR 
          UPROOTED, BUT WITH GREATER NUMBERS IN PLACES WHERE TREES 
          ARE SHALLOW ROOTED. SOME FENCES AND ROADWAY SIGNS BLOWN 
          OVER.
        - A FEW ROADS IMPASSABLE FROM DEBRIS, PARTICULARLY WITHIN 
          URBAN OR HEAVILY WOODED PLACES. HAZARDOUS DRIVING 
          CONDITIONS ON BRIDGES AND OTHER ELEVATED ROADWAYS.
        - SCATTERED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS IN EFFECT
        - PEAK RAINFALL AMOUNTS: ADDITIONAL 1-3 INCHES, WITH LOCALLY 
          HIGHER AMOUNTS

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR MODERATE 
      FLOODING RAIN
        - THE FLOODING RAIN THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM 
          THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: EMERGENCY PLANS SHOULD INCLUDE THE POTENTIAL FOR 
          MODERATE FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAIN. EVACUATIONS AND RESCUES 
          ARE POSSIBLE.
        - PREPARE: CONSIDER PROTECTIVE ACTIONS IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA 
          VULNERABLE TO FLOODING.
        - ACT: HEED ANY FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS. FAILURE TO TAKE 
          ACTION MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE. 

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: SIGNIFICANT
        - MODERATE RAINFALL FLOODING MAY PROMPT SEVERAL EVACUATIONS 
          AND RESCUES.
        - RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES MAY QUICKLY BECOME SWOLLEN WITH 
          SWIFTER CURRENTS AND OVERSPILL THEIR BANKS IN A FEW PLACES, 
          ESPECIALLY IN USUALLY VULNERABLE SPOTS. SMALL STREAMS, 
          CREEKS, CANALS, ARROYOS, AND DITCHES OVERFLOW.
        - FLOOD WATERS CAN ENTER SOME STRUCTURES OR WEAKEN 
          FOUNDATIONS. SEVERAL PLACES MAY EXPERIENCE EXPANDED AREAS 
          OF RAPID INUNDATION AT UNDERPASSES, LOW-LYING SPOTS, AND 
          POOR DRAINAGE AREAS. SOME STREETS AND PARKING LOTS TAKE ON 
          MOVING WATER AS STORM DRAINS AND RETENTION PONDS OVERFLOW. 
          DRIVING CONDITIONS BECOME HAZARDOUS. SOME ROAD AND BRIDGE 
          CLOSURES.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: 
        - SITUATION IS UNFAVORABLE FOR TORNADOES

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: TORNADOES NOT EXPECTED
        - THE TORNADO THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: TORNADOES ARE NOT EXPECTED. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS 
          WITH GUSTY WINDS MAY STILL OCCUR.
        - PREPARE: LITTLE TO NO PREPARATIONS NEEDED TO PROTECT 
          AGAINST TORNADOES AT THIS TIME. KEEP INFORMED OF THE LATEST 
          TORNADO SITUATION.
        - ACT: LISTEN FOR CHANGES IN THE FORECAST.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LITTLE TO NONE
        - LITTLE TO NO POTENTIAL IMPACTS FROM TORNADOES.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION:
    - HTTPS://READYNC.ORG
__________________________________________________________________________________

CALDWELL COUNTY MOUNTAINS

...TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS TROPICAL STORM-FORCE WINDS ARE 
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - PATTERSON

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: BELOW TROPICAL STORM FORCE WIND
        - PEAK WIND FORECAST: 10-20 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 30 MPH

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR WIND 39 TO 
      57 MPH
        - THE WIND THREAT HAS INCREASED FROM THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS WIND OF EQUIVALENT TROPICAL STORM 
          FORCE DUE TO POSSIBLE FORECAST CHANGES IN TRACK, SIZE, OR 
          INTENSITY.
        - PREPARE: EFFORTS TO PROTECT PROPERTY SHOULD NOW BE 
          UNDERWAY. PREPARE FOR LIMITED WIND DAMAGE.
        - ACT: ACT NOW TO COMPLETE PREPARATIONS BEFORE THE WIND 
          BECOMES HAZARDOUS.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LIMITED
        - DAMAGE TO PORCHES, AWNINGS, CARPORTS, SHEDS, AND UNANCHORED 
          MOBILE HOMES. UNSECURED LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS BLOWN ABOUT.
        - MANY LARGE TREE LIMBS BROKEN OFF. A FEW TREES SNAPPED OR 
          UPROOTED, BUT WITH GREATER NUMBERS IN PLACES WHERE TREES 
          ARE SHALLOW ROOTED. SOME FENCES AND ROADWAY SIGNS BLOWN 
          OVER.
        - A FEW ROADS IMPASSABLE FROM DEBRIS, PARTICULARLY WITHIN 
          URBAN OR HEAVILY WOODED PLACES. HAZARDOUS DRIVING 
          CONDITIONS ON BRIDGES AND OTHER ELEVATED ROADWAYS.
        - SCATTERED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS IN EFFECT
        - PEAK RAINFALL AMOUNTS: ADDITIONAL 1-3 INCHES, WITH LOCALLY 
          HIGHER AMOUNTS

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR MODERATE 
      FLOODING RAIN
        - THE FLOODING RAIN THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM 
          THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: EMERGENCY PLANS SHOULD INCLUDE THE POTENTIAL FOR 
          MODERATE FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAIN. EVACUATIONS AND RESCUES 
          ARE POSSIBLE.
        - PREPARE: CONSIDER PROTECTIVE ACTIONS IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA 
          VULNERABLE TO FLOODING.
        - ACT: HEED ANY FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS. FAILURE TO TAKE 
          ACTION MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE. 

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: SIGNIFICANT
        - MODERATE RAINFALL FLOODING MAY PROMPT SEVERAL EVACUATIONS 
          AND RESCUES.
        - RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES MAY QUICKLY BECOME SWOLLEN WITH 
          SWIFTER CURRENTS AND OVERSPILL THEIR BANKS IN A FEW PLACES, 
          ESPECIALLY IN USUALLY VULNERABLE SPOTS. SMALL STREAMS, 
          CREEKS, CANALS, ARROYOS, AND DITCHES OVERFLOW.
        - FLOOD WATERS CAN ENTER SOME STRUCTURES OR WEAKEN 
          FOUNDATIONS. SEVERAL PLACES MAY EXPERIENCE EXPANDED AREAS 
          OF RAPID INUNDATION AT UNDERPASSES, LOW-LYING SPOTS, AND 
          POOR DRAINAGE AREAS. SOME STREETS AND PARKING LOTS TAKE ON 
          MOVING WATER AS STORM DRAINS AND RETENTION PONDS OVERFLOW. 
          DRIVING CONDITIONS BECOME HAZARDOUS. SOME ROAD AND BRIDGE 
          CLOSURES.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: 
        - SITUATION IS UNFAVORABLE FOR TORNADOES

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: TORNADOES NOT EXPECTED
        - THE TORNADO THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: TORNADOES ARE NOT EXPECTED. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS 
          WITH GUSTY WINDS MAY STILL OCCUR.
        - PREPARE: LITTLE TO NO PREPARATIONS NEEDED TO PROTECT 
          AGAINST TORNADOES AT THIS TIME. KEEP INFORMED OF THE LATEST 
          TORNADO SITUATION.
        - ACT: LISTEN FOR CHANGES IN THE FORECAST.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LITTLE TO NONE
        - LITTLE TO NO POTENTIAL IMPACTS FROM TORNADOES.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION:
    - HTTPS://READYNC.ORG

____________________________________________________________________________

RUTHERFORD COUNTY MOUNTAINS

...TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS TROPICAL STORM-FORCE WINDS ARE 
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - LAKE LURE

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: BELOW TROPICAL STORM FORCE WIND
        - PEAK WIND FORECAST: 10-20 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 35 MPH

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR WIND 39 TO 
      57 MPH
        - THE WIND THREAT HAS INCREASED FROM THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS WIND OF EQUIVALENT TROPICAL STORM 
          FORCE DUE TO POSSIBLE FORECAST CHANGES IN TRACK, SIZE, OR 
          INTENSITY.
        - PREPARE: EFFORTS TO PROTECT PROPERTY SHOULD NOW BE 
          UNDERWAY. PREPARE FOR LIMITED WIND DAMAGE.
        - ACT: ACT NOW TO COMPLETE PREPARATIONS BEFORE THE WIND 
          BECOMES HAZARDOUS.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LIMITED
        - DAMAGE TO PORCHES, AWNINGS, CARPORTS, SHEDS, AND UNANCHORED 
          MOBILE HOMES. UNSECURED LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS BLOWN ABOUT.
        - MANY LARGE TREE LIMBS BROKEN OFF. A FEW TREES SNAPPED OR 
          UPROOTED, BUT WITH GREATER NUMBERS IN PLACES WHERE TREES 
          ARE SHALLOW ROOTED. SOME FENCES AND ROADWAY SIGNS BLOWN 
          OVER.
        - A FEW ROADS IMPASSABLE FROM DEBRIS, PARTICULARLY WITHIN 
          URBAN OR HEAVILY WOODED PLACES. HAZARDOUS DRIVING 
          CONDITIONS ON BRIDGES AND OTHER ELEVATED ROADWAYS.
        - SCATTERED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS IN EFFECT
        - PEAK RAINFALL AMOUNTS: ADDITIONAL 1-3 INCHES, WITH LOCALLY 
          HIGHER AMOUNTS

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR MODERATE 
      FLOODING RAIN
        - THE FLOODING RAIN THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM 
          THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: EMERGENCY PLANS SHOULD INCLUDE THE POTENTIAL FOR 
          MODERATE FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAIN. EVACUATIONS AND RESCUES 
          ARE POSSIBLE.
        - PREPARE: CONSIDER PROTECTIVE ACTIONS IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA 
          VULNERABLE TO FLOODING.
        - ACT: HEED ANY FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS. FAILURE TO TAKE 
          ACTION MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE. 

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: SIGNIFICANT
        - MODERATE RAINFALL FLOODING MAY PROMPT SEVERAL EVACUATIONS 
          AND RESCUES.
        - RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES MAY QUICKLY BECOME SWOLLEN WITH 
          SWIFTER CURRENTS AND OVERSPILL THEIR BANKS IN A FEW PLACES, 
          ESPECIALLY IN USUALLY VULNERABLE SPOTS. SMALL STREAMS, 
          CREEKS, CANALS, ARROYOS, AND DITCHES OVERFLOW.
        - FLOOD WATERS CAN ENTER SOME STRUCTURES OR WEAKEN 
          FOUNDATIONS. SEVERAL PLACES MAY EXPERIENCE EXPANDED AREAS 
          OF RAPID INUNDATION AT UNDERPASSES, LOW-LYING SPOTS, AND 
          POOR DRAINAGE AREAS. SOME STREETS AND PARKING LOTS TAKE ON 
          MOVING WATER AS STORM DRAINS AND RETENTION PONDS OVERFLOW. 
          DRIVING CONDITIONS BECOME HAZARDOUS. SOME ROAD AND BRIDGE 
          CLOSURES.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: 
        - SITUATION IS UNFAVORABLE FOR TORNADOES

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: TORNADOES NOT EXPECTED
        - THE TORNADO THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: TORNADOES ARE NOT EXPECTED. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS 
          WITH GUSTY WINDS MAY STILL OCCUR.
        - PREPARE: LITTLE TO NO PREPARATIONS NEEDED TO PROTECT 
          AGAINST TORNADOES AT THIS TIME. KEEP INFORMED OF THE LATEST 
          TORNADO SITUATION.
        - ACT: LISTEN FOR CHANGES IN THE FORECAST.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LITTLE TO NONE
        - LITTLE TO NO POTENTIAL IMPACTS FROM TORNADOES.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION:
    - HTTPS://READYNC.ORG
_________________________________________________________________________________

GREATER MCDOWELL COUNTY

..TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS TROPICAL STORM-FORCE WINDS ARE 
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - MARION

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: BELOW TROPICAL STORM FORCE WIND
        - PEAK WIND FORECAST: 10-20 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 30 MPH

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR WIND 39 TO 
      57 MPH
        - THE WIND THREAT HAS INCREASED FROM THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS WIND OF EQUIVALENT TROPICAL STORM 
          FORCE DUE TO POSSIBLE FORECAST CHANGES IN TRACK, SIZE, OR 
          INTENSITY.
        - PREPARE: EFFORTS TO PROTECT PROPERTY SHOULD NOW BE 
          UNDERWAY. PREPARE FOR LIMITED WIND DAMAGE.
        - ACT: ACT NOW TO COMPLETE PREPARATIONS BEFORE THE WIND 
          BECOMES HAZARDOUS.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LIMITED
        - DAMAGE TO PORCHES, AWNINGS, CARPORTS, SHEDS, AND UNANCHORED 
          MOBILE HOMES. UNSECURED LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS BLOWN ABOUT.
        - MANY LARGE TREE LIMBS BROKEN OFF. A FEW TREES SNAPPED OR 
          UPROOTED, BUT WITH GREATER NUMBERS IN PLACES WHERE TREES 
          ARE SHALLOW ROOTED. SOME FENCES AND ROADWAY SIGNS BLOWN 
          OVER.
        - A FEW ROADS IMPASSABLE FROM DEBRIS, PARTICULARLY WITHIN 
          URBAN OR HEAVILY WOODED PLACES. HAZARDOUS DRIVING 
          CONDITIONS ON BRIDGES AND OTHER ELEVATED ROADWAYS.
        - SCATTERED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS IN EFFECT
        - PEAK RAINFALL AMOUNTS: ADDITIONAL 1-3 INCHES, WITH LOCALLY 
          HIGHER AMOUNTS

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR MODERATE 
      FLOODING RAIN
        - THE FLOODING RAIN THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM 
          THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: EMERGENCY PLANS SHOULD INCLUDE THE POTENTIAL FOR 
          MODERATE FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAIN. EVACUATIONS AND RESCUES 
          ARE POSSIBLE.
        - PREPARE: CONSIDER PROTECTIVE ACTIONS IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA 
          VULNERABLE TO FLOODING.
        - ACT: HEED ANY FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS. FAILURE TO TAKE 
          ACTION MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE. 

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: SIGNIFICANT
        - MODERATE RAINFALL FLOODING MAY PROMPT SEVERAL EVACUATIONS 
          AND RESCUES.
        - RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES MAY QUICKLY BECOME SWOLLEN WITH 
          SWIFTER CURRENTS AND OVERSPILL THEIR BANKS IN A FEW PLACES, 
          ESPECIALLY IN USUALLY VULNERABLE SPOTS. SMALL STREAMS, 
          CREEKS, CANALS, ARROYOS, AND DITCHES OVERFLOW.
        - FLOOD WATERS CAN ENTER SOME STRUCTURES OR WEAKEN 
          FOUNDATIONS. SEVERAL PLACES MAY EXPERIENCE EXPANDED AREAS 
          OF RAPID INUNDATION AT UNDERPASSES, LOW-LYING SPOTS, AND 
          POOR DRAINAGE AREAS. SOME STREETS AND PARKING LOTS TAKE ON 
          MOVING WATER AS STORM DRAINS AND RETENTION PONDS OVERFLOW. 
          DRIVING CONDITIONS BECOME HAZARDOUS. SOME ROAD AND BRIDGE 
          CLOSURES.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: 
        - SITUATION IS UNFAVORABLE FOR TORNADOES

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: TORNADOES NOT EXPECTED
        - THE TORNADO THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: TORNADOES ARE NOT EXPECTED. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS 
          WITH GUSTY WINDS MAY STILL OCCUR.
        - PREPARE: LITTLE TO NO PREPARATIONS NEEDED TO PROTECT 
          AGAINST TORNADOES AT THIS TIME. KEEP INFORMED OF THE LATEST 
          TORNADO SITUATION.
        - ACT: LISTEN FOR CHANGES IN THE FORECAST.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LITTLE TO NONE
        - LITTLE TO NO POTENTIAL IMPACTS FROM TORNADOES.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION:
    - HTTPS://READYNC.ORG

_______________________________________________________________________________

MCDOWELL COUNTY MOUNTAINS

...TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS TROPICAL STORM-FORCE WINDS ARE 
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - OLD FORT

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: BELOW TROPICAL STORM FORCE WIND
        - PEAK WIND FORECAST: 15-25 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 35 MPH

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR WIND 39 TO 
      57 MPH
        - THE WIND THREAT HAS INCREASED FROM THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS WIND OF EQUIVALENT TROPICAL STORM 
          FORCE DUE TO POSSIBLE FORECAST CHANGES IN TRACK, SIZE, OR 
          INTENSITY.
        - PREPARE: EFFORTS TO PROTECT PROPERTY SHOULD NOW BE 
          UNDERWAY. PREPARE FOR LIMITED WIND DAMAGE.
        - ACT: ACT NOW TO COMPLETE PREPARATIONS BEFORE THE WIND 
          BECOMES HAZARDOUS.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LIMITED
        - DAMAGE TO PORCHES, AWNINGS, CARPORTS, SHEDS, AND UNANCHORED 
          MOBILE HOMES. UNSECURED LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS BLOWN ABOUT.
        - MANY LARGE TREE LIMBS BROKEN OFF. A FEW TREES SNAPPED OR 
          UPROOTED, BUT WITH GREATER NUMBERS IN PLACES WHERE TREES 
          ARE SHALLOW ROOTED. SOME FENCES AND ROADWAY SIGNS BLOWN 
          OVER.
        - A FEW ROADS IMPASSABLE FROM DEBRIS, PARTICULARLY WITHIN 
          URBAN OR HEAVILY WOODED PLACES. HAZARDOUS DRIVING 
          CONDITIONS ON BRIDGES AND OTHER ELEVATED ROADWAYS.
        - SCATTERED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS IN EFFECT
        - PEAK RAINFALL AMOUNTS: ADDITIONAL 1-3 INCHES, WITH LOCALLY 
          HIGHER AMOUNTS

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR MODERATE 
      FLOODING RAIN
        - THE FLOODING RAIN THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM 
          THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: EMERGENCY PLANS SHOULD INCLUDE THE POTENTIAL FOR 
          MODERATE FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAIN. EVACUATIONS AND RESCUES 
          ARE POSSIBLE.
        - PREPARE: CONSIDER PROTECTIVE ACTIONS IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA 
          VULNERABLE TO FLOODING.
        - ACT: HEED ANY FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS. FAILURE TO TAKE 
          ACTION MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE. 

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: SIGNIFICANT
        - MODERATE RAINFALL FLOODING MAY PROMPT SEVERAL EVACUATIONS 
          AND RESCUES.
        - RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES MAY QUICKLY BECOME SWOLLEN WITH 
          SWIFTER CURRENTS AND OVERSPILL THEIR BANKS IN A FEW PLACES, 
          ESPECIALLY IN USUALLY VULNERABLE SPOTS. SMALL STREAMS, 
          CREEKS, CANALS, ARROYOS, AND DITCHES OVERFLOW.
        - FLOOD WATERS CAN ENTER SOME STRUCTURES OR WEAKEN 
          FOUNDATIONS. SEVERAL PLACES MAY EXPERIENCE EXPANDED AREAS 
          OF RAPID INUNDATION AT UNDERPASSES, LOW-LYING SPOTS, AND 
          POOR DRAINAGE AREAS. SOME STREETS AND PARKING LOTS TAKE ON 
          MOVING WATER AS STORM DRAINS AND RETENTION PONDS OVERFLOW. 
          DRIVING CONDITIONS BECOME HAZARDOUS. SOME ROAD AND BRIDGE 
          CLOSURES.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: 
        - SITUATION IS UNFAVORABLE FOR TORNADOES

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: TORNADOES NOT EXPECTED
        - THE TORNADO THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: TORNADOES ARE NOT EXPECTED. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS 
          WITH GUSTY WINDS MAY STILL OCCUR.
        - PREPARE: LITTLE TO NO PREPARATIONS NEEDED TO PROTECT 
          AGAINST TORNADOES AT THIS TIME. KEEP INFORMED OF THE LATEST 
          TORNADO SITUATION.
        - ACT: LISTEN FOR CHANGES IN THE FORECAST.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LITTLE TO NONE
        - LITTLE TO NO POTENTIAL IMPACTS FROM TORNADOES.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION:
    - HTTPS://READYNC.ORG
___________________________________________________________________________________

GREATER BURKE COUNTY

...TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS TROPICAL STORM-FORCE WINDS ARE 
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - MORGANTON

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: BELOW TROPICAL STORM FORCE WIND
        - PEAK WIND FORECAST: 10-20 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 30 MPH

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR WIND 39 TO 
      57 MPH
        - THE WIND THREAT HAS INCREASED FROM THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS WIND OF EQUIVALENT TROPICAL STORM 
          FORCE DUE TO POSSIBLE FORECAST CHANGES IN TRACK, SIZE, OR 
          INTENSITY.
        - PREPARE: EFFORTS TO PROTECT PROPERTY SHOULD NOW BE 
          UNDERWAY. PREPARE FOR LIMITED WIND DAMAGE.
        - ACT: ACT NOW TO COMPLETE PREPARATIONS BEFORE THE WIND 
          BECOMES HAZARDOUS.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LIMITED
        - DAMAGE TO PORCHES, AWNINGS, CARPORTS, SHEDS, AND UNANCHORED 
          MOBILE HOMES. UNSECURED LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS BLOWN ABOUT.
        - MANY LARGE TREE LIMBS BROKEN OFF. A FEW TREES SNAPPED OR 
          UPROOTED, BUT WITH GREATER NUMBERS IN PLACES WHERE TREES 
          ARE SHALLOW ROOTED. SOME FENCES AND ROADWAY SIGNS BLOWN 
          OVER.
        - A FEW ROADS IMPASSABLE FROM DEBRIS, PARTICULARLY WITHIN 
          URBAN OR HEAVILY WOODED PLACES. HAZARDOUS DRIVING 
          CONDITIONS ON BRIDGES AND OTHER ELEVATED ROADWAYS.
        - SCATTERED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS IN EFFECT
        - PEAK RAINFALL AMOUNTS: ADDITIONAL 1-3 INCHES, WITH LOCALLY 
          HIGHER AMOUNTS

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR MODERATE 
      FLOODING RAIN
        - THE FLOODING RAIN THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM 
          THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: EMERGENCY PLANS SHOULD INCLUDE THE POTENTIAL FOR 
          MODERATE FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAIN. EVACUATIONS AND RESCUES 
          ARE POSSIBLE.
        - PREPARE: CONSIDER PROTECTIVE ACTIONS IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA 
          VULNERABLE TO FLOODING.
        - ACT: HEED ANY FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS. FAILURE TO TAKE 
          ACTION MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE. 

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: SIGNIFICANT
        - MODERATE RAINFALL FLOODING MAY PROMPT SEVERAL EVACUATIONS 
          AND RESCUES.
        - RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES MAY QUICKLY BECOME SWOLLEN WITH 
          SWIFTER CURRENTS AND OVERSPILL THEIR BANKS IN A FEW PLACES, 
          ESPECIALLY IN USUALLY VULNERABLE SPOTS. SMALL STREAMS, 
          CREEKS, CANALS, ARROYOS, AND DITCHES OVERFLOW.
        - FLOOD WATERS CAN ENTER SOME STRUCTURES OR WEAKEN 
          FOUNDATIONS. SEVERAL PLACES MAY EXPERIENCE EXPANDED AREAS 
          OF RAPID INUNDATION AT UNDERPASSES, LOW-LYING SPOTS, AND 
          POOR DRAINAGE AREAS. SOME STREETS AND PARKING LOTS TAKE ON 
          MOVING WATER AS STORM DRAINS AND RETENTION PONDS OVERFLOW. 
          DRIVING CONDITIONS BECOME HAZARDOUS. SOME ROAD AND BRIDGE 
          CLOSURES.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: 
        - SITUATION IS UNFAVORABLE FOR TORNADOES

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: TORNADOES NOT EXPECTED
        - THE TORNADO THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: TORNADOES ARE NOT EXPECTED. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS 
          WITH GUSTY WINDS MAY STILL OCCUR.
        - PREPARE: LITTLE TO NO PREPARATIONS NEEDED TO PROTECT 
          AGAINST TORNADOES AT THIS TIME. KEEP INFORMED OF THE LATEST 
          TORNADO SITUATION.
        - ACT: LISTEN FOR CHANGES IN THE FORECAST.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LITTLE TO NONE
        - LITTLE TO NO POTENTIAL IMPACTS FROM TORNADOES.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION:
    - HTTPS://READYNC.ORG

_______________________________________________________________________________

GREATER RUTHERFORD COUNTY

...TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS TROPICAL STORM-FORCE WINDS ARE 
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - FOREST CITY

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: BELOW TROPICAL STORM FORCE WIND
        - PEAK WIND FORECAST: 10-20 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 30 MPH

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR WIND 39 TO 
      57 MPH
        - THE WIND THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS WIND OF EQUIVALENT TROPICAL STORM 
          FORCE DUE TO POSSIBLE FORECAST CHANGES IN TRACK, SIZE, OR 
          INTENSITY.
        - PREPARE: EFFORTS TO PROTECT PROPERTY SHOULD NOW BE 
          UNDERWAY. PREPARE FOR LIMITED WIND DAMAGE.
        - ACT: ACT NOW TO COMPLETE PREPARATIONS BEFORE THE WIND 
          BECOMES HAZARDOUS.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LIMITED
        - DAMAGE TO PORCHES, AWNINGS, CARPORTS, SHEDS, AND UNANCHORED 
          MOBILE HOMES. UNSECURED LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS BLOWN ABOUT.
        - MANY LARGE TREE LIMBS BROKEN OFF. A FEW TREES SNAPPED OR 
          UPROOTED, BUT WITH GREATER NUMBERS IN PLACES WHERE TREES 
          ARE SHALLOW ROOTED. SOME FENCES AND ROADWAY SIGNS BLOWN 
          OVER.
        - A FEW ROADS IMPASSABLE FROM DEBRIS, PARTICULARLY WITHIN 
          URBAN OR HEAVILY WOODED PLACES. HAZARDOUS DRIVING 
          CONDITIONS ON BRIDGES AND OTHER ELEVATED ROADWAYS.
        - SCATTERED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS IN EFFECT
        - PEAK RAINFALL AMOUNTS: ADDITIONAL 1-3 INCHES, WITH LOCALLY 
          HIGHER AMOUNTS

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR MODERATE 
      FLOODING RAIN
        - THE FLOODING RAIN THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM 
          THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: EMERGENCY PLANS SHOULD INCLUDE THE POTENTIAL FOR 
          MODERATE FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAIN. EVACUATIONS AND RESCUES 
          ARE POSSIBLE.
        - PREPARE: CONSIDER PROTECTIVE ACTIONS IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA 
          VULNERABLE TO FLOODING.
        - ACT: HEED ANY FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS. FAILURE TO TAKE 
          ACTION MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE. 

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: SIGNIFICANT
        - MODERATE RAINFALL FLOODING MAY PROMPT SEVERAL EVACUATIONS 
          AND RESCUES.
        - RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES MAY QUICKLY BECOME SWOLLEN WITH 
          SWIFTER CURRENTS AND OVERSPILL THEIR BANKS IN A FEW PLACES, 
          ESPECIALLY IN USUALLY VULNERABLE SPOTS. SMALL STREAMS, 
          CREEKS, CANALS, ARROYOS, AND DITCHES OVERFLOW.
        - FLOOD WATERS CAN ENTER SOME STRUCTURES OR WEAKEN 
          FOUNDATIONS. SEVERAL PLACES MAY EXPERIENCE EXPANDED AREAS 
          OF RAPID INUNDATION AT UNDERPASSES, LOW-LYING SPOTS, AND 
          POOR DRAINAGE AREAS. SOME STREETS AND PARKING LOTS TAKE ON 
          MOVING WATER AS STORM DRAINS AND RETENTION PONDS OVERFLOW. 
          DRIVING CONDITIONS BECOME HAZARDOUS. SOME ROAD AND BRIDGE 
          CLOSURES.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: 
        - SITUATION IS UNFAVORABLE FOR TORNADOES

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: TORNADOES NOT EXPECTED
        - THE TORNADO THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: TORNADOES ARE NOT EXPECTED. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS 
          WITH GUSTY WINDS MAY STILL OCCUR.
        - PREPARE: LITTLE TO NO PREPARATIONS NEEDED TO PROTECT 
          AGAINST TORNADOES AT THIS TIME. KEEP INFORMED OF THE LATEST 
          TORNADO SITUATION.
        - ACT: LISTEN FOR CHANGES IN THE FORECAST.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LITTLE TO NONE
        - LITTLE TO NO POTENTIAL IMPACTS FROM TORNADOES.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION:
    - HTTPS://READYNC.ORG
________________________________________________________________________________

LINCOLN COUNTY

...TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS TROPICAL STORM-FORCE WINDS ARE 
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - LINCOLNTON

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: BELOW TROPICAL STORM FORCE WIND
        - PEAK WIND FORECAST: 10-20 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 35 MPH

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR WIND 39 TO 
      57 MPH
        - THE WIND THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS WIND OF EQUIVALENT TROPICAL STORM 
          FORCE DUE TO POSSIBLE FORECAST CHANGES IN TRACK, SIZE, OR 
          INTENSITY.
        - PREPARE: EFFORTS TO PROTECT PROPERTY SHOULD NOW BE 
          UNDERWAY. PREPARE FOR LIMITED WIND DAMAGE.
        - ACT: ACT NOW TO COMPLETE PREPARATIONS BEFORE THE WIND 
          BECOMES HAZARDOUS.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LIMITED
        - DAMAGE TO PORCHES, AWNINGS, CARPORTS, SHEDS, AND UNANCHORED 
          MOBILE HOMES. UNSECURED LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS BLOWN ABOUT.
        - MANY LARGE TREE LIMBS BROKEN OFF. A FEW TREES SNAPPED OR 
          UPROOTED, BUT WITH GREATER NUMBERS IN PLACES WHERE TREES 
          ARE SHALLOW ROOTED. SOME FENCES AND ROADWAY SIGNS BLOWN 
          OVER.
        - A FEW ROADS IMPASSABLE FROM DEBRIS, PARTICULARLY WITHIN 
          URBAN OR HEAVILY WOODED PLACES. HAZARDOUS DRIVING 
          CONDITIONS ON BRIDGES AND OTHER ELEVATED ROADWAYS.
        - SCATTERED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS IN EFFECT
        - PEAK RAINFALL AMOUNTS: ADDITIONAL 3-6 INCHES, WITH LOCALLY 
          HIGHER AMOUNTS

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR MAJOR 
      FLOODING RAIN
        - THE FLOODING RAIN THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM 
          THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: EMERGENCY PLANS SHOULD INCLUDE THE POTENTIAL FOR 
          MAJOR FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAIN. EVACUATIONS AND RESCUES ARE 
          LIKELY.
        - PREPARE: STRONGLY CONSIDER PROTECTIVE ACTIONS, ESPECIALLY 
          IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA VULNERABLE TO FLOODING.
        - ACT: HEED ANY FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS. FAILURE TO TAKE 
          ACTION WILL LIKELY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: EXTENSIVE
        - MAJOR RAINFALL FLOODING MAY PROMPT MANY EVACUATIONS AND 
          RESCUES.
        - RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES MAY RAPIDLY OVERFLOW THEIR BANKS IN 
          MULTIPLE PLACES. SMALL STREAMS, CREEKS, CANALS, ARROYOS, 
          AND DITCHES MAY BECOME DANGEROUS RIVERS. IN MOUNTAIN AREAS, 
          DESTRUCTIVE RUNOFF MAY RUN QUICKLY DOWN VALLEYS WHILE 
          INCREASING SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ROCKSLIDES AND MUDSLIDES. 
          FLOOD CONTROL SYSTEMS AND BARRIERS MAY BECOME STRESSED.
        - FLOOD WATERS CAN ENTER MANY STRUCTURES WITHIN MULTIPLE 
          COMMUNITIES, SOME STRUCTURES BECOMING UNINHABITABLE OR 
          WASHED AWAY. MANY PLACES WHERE FLOOD WATERS MAY COVER 
          ESCAPE ROUTES. STREETS AND PARKING LOTS BECOME RIVERS OF 
          MOVING WATER WITH UNDERPASSES SUBMERGED. DRIVING CONDITIONS 
          BECOME DANGEROUS. MANY ROAD AND BRIDGE CLOSURES WITH SOME 
          WEAKENED OR WASHED OUT.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: 
        - SITUATION IS UNFAVORABLE FOR TORNADOES

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: TORNADOES NOT EXPECTED
        - THE TORNADO THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: TORNADOES ARE NOT EXPECTED. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS 
          WITH GUSTY WINDS MAY STILL OCCUR.
        - PREPARE: LITTLE TO NO PREPARATIONS NEEDED TO PROTECT 
          AGAINST TORNADOES AT THIS TIME. KEEP INFORMED OF THE LATEST 
          TORNADO SITUATION.
        - ACT: LISTEN FOR CHANGES IN THE FORECAST.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LITTLE TO NONE
        - LITTLE TO NO POTENTIAL IMPACTS FROM TORNADOES.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION:
    - HTTPS://READYNC.ORG

______________________________________________________________________________

CLEVELAND COUNTY

..TROPICAL STORM WARNING IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS TROPICAL STORM-FORCE WINDS ARE 
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED
    - SHELBY

* WIND
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: BELOW TROPICAL STORM FORCE WIND
        - PEAK WIND FORECAST: 10-20 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 35 MPH

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR WIND 39 TO 
      57 MPH
        - THE WIND THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS WIND OF EQUIVALENT TROPICAL STORM 
          FORCE DUE TO POSSIBLE FORECAST CHANGES IN TRACK, SIZE, OR 
          INTENSITY.
        - PREPARE: EFFORTS TO PROTECT PROPERTY SHOULD NOW BE 
          UNDERWAY. PREPARE FOR LIMITED WIND DAMAGE.
        - ACT: ACT NOW TO COMPLETE PREPARATIONS BEFORE THE WIND 
          BECOMES HAZARDOUS.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LIMITED
        - DAMAGE TO PORCHES, AWNINGS, CARPORTS, SHEDS, AND UNANCHORED 
          MOBILE HOMES. UNSECURED LIGHTWEIGHT OBJECTS BLOWN ABOUT.
        - MANY LARGE TREE LIMBS BROKEN OFF. A FEW TREES SNAPPED OR 
          UPROOTED, BUT WITH GREATER NUMBERS IN PLACES WHERE TREES 
          ARE SHALLOW ROOTED. SOME FENCES AND ROADWAY SIGNS BLOWN 
          OVER.
        - A FEW ROADS IMPASSABLE FROM DEBRIS, PARTICULARLY WITHIN 
          URBAN OR HEAVILY WOODED PLACES. HAZARDOUS DRIVING 
          CONDITIONS ON BRIDGES AND OTHER ELEVATED ROADWAYS.
        - SCATTERED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.

* FLOODING RAIN
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS IN EFFECT
        - PEAK RAINFALL AMOUNTS: ADDITIONAL 2-4 INCHES, WITH LOCALLY 
          HIGHER AMOUNTS

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: POTENTIAL FOR MAJOR 
      FLOODING RAIN
        - THE FLOODING RAIN THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM 
          THE PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: EMERGENCY PLANS SHOULD INCLUDE THE POTENTIAL FOR 
          MAJOR FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAIN. EVACUATIONS AND RESCUES ARE 
          LIKELY.
        - PREPARE: STRONGLY CONSIDER PROTECTIVE ACTIONS, ESPECIALLY 
          IF YOU ARE IN AN AREA VULNERABLE TO FLOODING.
        - ACT: HEED ANY FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS. FAILURE TO TAKE 
          ACTION WILL LIKELY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR LOSS OF LIFE.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: EXTENSIVE
        - MAJOR RAINFALL FLOODING MAY PROMPT MANY EVACUATIONS AND 
          RESCUES.
        - RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES MAY RAPIDLY OVERFLOW THEIR BANKS IN 
          MULTIPLE PLACES. SMALL STREAMS, CREEKS, CANALS, ARROYOS, 
          AND DITCHES MAY BECOME DANGEROUS RIVERS. IN MOUNTAIN AREAS, 
          DESTRUCTIVE RUNOFF MAY RUN QUICKLY DOWN VALLEYS WHILE 
          INCREASING SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ROCKSLIDES AND MUDSLIDES. 
          FLOOD CONTROL SYSTEMS AND BARRIERS MAY BECOME STRESSED.
        - FLOOD WATERS CAN ENTER MANY STRUCTURES WITHIN MULTIPLE 
          COMMUNITIES, SOME STRUCTURES BECOMING UNINHABITABLE OR 
          WASHED AWAY. MANY PLACES WHERE FLOOD WATERS MAY COVER 
          ESCAPE ROUTES. STREETS AND PARKING LOTS BECOME RIVERS OF 
          MOVING WATER WITH UNDERPASSES SUBMERGED. DRIVING CONDITIONS 
          BECOME DANGEROUS. MANY ROAD AND BRIDGE CLOSURES WITH SOME 
          WEAKENED OR WASHED OUT.

* TORNADO
    - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: 
        - SITUATION IS UNFAVORABLE FOR TORNADOES

    - POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: TORNADOES NOT EXPECTED
        - THE TORNADO THREAT HAS REMAINED NEARLY STEADY FROM THE 
          PREVIOUS ASSESSMENT.
        - PLAN: TORNADOES ARE NOT EXPECTED. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS 
          WITH GUSTY WINDS MAY STILL OCCUR.
        - PREPARE: LITTLE TO NO PREPARATIONS NEEDED TO PROTECT 
          AGAINST TORNADOES AT THIS TIME. KEEP INFORMED OF THE LATEST 
          TORNADO SITUATION.
        - ACT: LISTEN FOR CHANGES IN THE FORECAST.

    - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: LITTLE TO NONE
        - LITTLE TO NO POTENTIAL IMPACTS FROM TORNADOES.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Hurricane Michael Briefing 4.0. This Will Likely Need Updating Several Times Today So Stay Tuned

Good Wednesday Morning and once again apologies on this being a little late this morning. There have been some adjustments in the track of Michael overnight due to the storm becoming stronger than originally forecast. Michael is now a very dangerous category 4 hurricane and indications are that it is still strengthening. The storm is about 105 miles southwest of Panama City Florida and moving North. That movement is important. The storm has not taken that Northeast jog yet, placing it on the western side of the update track. The National Hurricane Center track and position will now be updated hourly until landfall occurs later today.

The impacts dont stop there. Michael will accelerate North and eventually NNE through the day today. This storm is now expected to maintain category 1 hurricane status all the way until it reaches a position just barely SE of Charlotte tomorrow. The storm will have the strongest winds on its east and northeast side. Unfortunately that means another strong storm for our neighbors down East. The storm will maintain a strong tropical storm status until it exits off the East coast near Hampton Roads VA Friday Morning.

Locally impacts have changed. Still talking about a very low tornado threat on the NW side of the storm. That is the good news. The bad news is that Michael will now interact with a frontal boundary closer to our area. Wind gusts have been increased due to this interaction between the front and the hurricane. I have also adjusted rainfall up a tick to account for a more prolonged heavy rain event. In the western counties of Burke, Caldwell, McDowell, and Rutherford you will notice a more widespread rainfall total forecast. The highest totals in those counties will be along the East and especially the Southeast facing slopes.

My concern is growing for a greater flood potential in Catawba, Cleveland, and Lincoln Counties for Thursday. In those three counties I bumped totals up another category. That will need some further attention with our next update that will come out during the early afternoon, around 2:00pm.

Alexander County your impacts have went up too but right now I was conservative on your rainfall numbers due to the current track but again, that too will need more attention from us through the day as we nail this thing down along with our partners at The National Weather Service.

Stay tuned and here are the latest graphics.

Hurricane Local Statement

Hurricane Michael Local Statement Advisory Number 15National Weather Service Greenville-Spartanburg SC AL142018
527 AM EDT Wed Oct 10 2018

This product covers the western Carolinas and NE Georgia

**Michael will bring heavy rainfall and gusty winds to the western Carolinas and Northeast Georgia**


NEW INFORMATION
---------------

* CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS:
- A Tropical Storm Watch has been issued for Chester, Laurens, Union, Union, and York
- A Tropical Storm Warning has been issued for Abbeville, Elbert, and Greenwood

* CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS:
- A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Chester, Laurens, Union, Union, and York
- A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Abbeville, Elbert, and Greenwood

* STORM INFORMATION:
- About 580 miles southwest of Charlotte NC or about 520 miles south-southwest of Greenville/Spartanburg SC
- 28.3N 86.5W
- Storm Intensity 140 mph
- Movement North or 360 degrees at 13 mph


SITUATION OVERVIEW
------------------

Hurricane Michael is forecast to make landfall as a major hurricane near Panama City, Florida this afternoon. Michael is forecast to track
northeastward across Georgia as a Tropical Storm, with the center of the circulation likely passing near Augusta, Georgia and Columbia,
South Carolina tomorrow, then on to near Fayetteville, North Carolina by Thursday evening. Although the western Carolinas and northeast
Georgia currently look to remain on the western side of the storm as it passes, windy conditions and very heavy rainfall will impact parts
of the area.

The greatest threat that Michael will pose for our area currently appears to be flash flooding. Based on the most likely track of the storm, the heaviest rainfall totals are expected to be along and south of Interstate 85. The Charlotte metropolitan area is at particular risk of flash flooding, due to very high rainfall rates developing tomorrow along with excessive urban runoff. Areas that flooded during heavy rainfall last month with Florence may flood again during Michael.

Winds will pick up in speed overnight tonight and peak during the day tomorrow. A few tropical-storm force gusts are possible. There is also
a risk of isolated tornadoes in the lower Piedmont during this time.


POTENTIAL IMPACTS
-----------------

* FLOODING RAIN:
Prepare for dangerous rainfall flooding having possible significant impacts in the eastern Upstate and southwest North Carolina Piedmont, including Charlotte. Potential impacts include:
- Moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and rescues.
- Rivers and tributaries may quickly become swollen with swifter currents and overspill their banks in a few places, especially
in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, arroyos, and ditches overflow.
- Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations. Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid inundation at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions
become hazardous. Some road and bridge closures.

Prepare for locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible limited impacts across the western Upstate, northeast Georgia, andthe mountains and foothills of western North Carolina.

* WIND:
Prepare for hazardous wind having possible limited impacts along andsouth of Interstate 85. Potential impacts in this area include:
- Damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
- Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
- A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways.
- Scattered power and communications outages.

Elsewhere across the western Carolinas and NE Georgia, little to no impact is anticipated.

* TORNADOES:
Prepare for a tornado event having possible limited impacts across the Lakelands of Georgia and South Carolina, as well as other parts
of the southern Upstate. Potential impacts include:
- The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events.
- A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions.
- Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow-rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings.

Elsewhere across the western Carolinas and NE Georgia, little to no impact is anticipated.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS
----------------------------------

* EVACUATIONS:

If evacuating, leave with a destination in mind and allow extra timeto get there. Take your emergency supplies kit. Gas up your vehicleahead of time. Let others know where you are going prior to departure. Secure loose items and pets in the car, and avoid distracted driving.

* OTHER PREPAREDNESS INFORMATION:

Now is the time to check your emergency plan and emergency supplies kit and take necessary actions to protect your family and secure your
home or business.

When making safety and preparedness decisions, do not focus on the exact forecast track since hazards such as flooding rain, damaging
wind gusts, storm surge, and tornadoes extend well away from the center of the storm.

If you live in a place particularly vulnerable to flooding, such as near the ocean or a large inland lake, in a low-lying or poor drainage area, in a valley, or near an already swollen river, plan to move to safe shelter on higher ground.

There is a threat from tornadoes with this storm. Have multiple ways to receive Tornado Warnings. Be ready to shelter quickly.

* ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION:
- For information on appropriate preparations see ready.gov
- For information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.org
- For additional disaster preparedness information see redcross.org

NEXT UPDATE
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Greenville-Spartanburg SC around 11 AM EDT, or sooner if
conditions warrant.

Hurricane Michael High Impact Briefing (Tuesday October 9th, 8 pm)

Submitted by: Daniel Crawley


Good Tuesday evening to everyone, here is the latest on Michael, now a Major Hurricane in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico…

NOTE: As you move through our briefing make sure to click on the “Key Messages”, “Impact Scale” and “County Impacts” slides to move to find specific information tailored to your area…



MichaelTuesEve1.png



MichaelTuesEve.png


KEY MESSAGES





IMPACT SCALE and RAIN/WIND FORECAST










LOCAL IMPACTS (BY COUNTY)






























Hurricane Michael 3.0 Early Tuesday Edition. Initial Forecast Of Impacts By County Included.

0400hrs -  Chief Meteorologist Chris White

Early Tuesday Morning Edition

Good Tuesday Morning. Michael will undergo rapid intensification today and become a strong Category 3 Hurricane. Michael will then start to move NNE toward the Big Bend of Florida tonight. We expect landfall Wednesday between the Big Bend and Panama City. Storm surge of 6-12ft will accompany this storm and likely lead to the most districtive storm for that area since Opal in 1995. If you have family or friends in that area they need to evacuate because once the storm hits there, emergency crews will no be able to access them.

 

Locally though we continue to get a better handle on the track of this storm once landfall occurs Wednesday. A mid latitude trough will sweep a cold front into the area from the west. That front is developing now out in the Rockies with low pressure over West TX and the Oklahoma Panhandle. That front will move into the mountains on Wednesday Night and Thursday, forcing the ridge of high pressure currently over us off to the east into the Atlantic. Michael will continue its NNE movement to a position Thursday Morning near Columbia SC. As Michael phases with this cold front it’s forward movement will accelerate. That will keep the impacts of Michael down across NC. The bad news is the heaviest rainfall totals and winds look like they will be in Eastern NC where widespread 5-8 inch rainfall totals are likely with some locations seeing 10 inches. In an area that was battered by Florence just three weeks ago, this isn’t great news but it could be worse. Michael should hold onto tropical storm status as it progresses across the Southeast before exiting the East Coast, just North of Kitty Hawk NC.

Along the East and northeast quadrant of the storm there will be a tornado threat. Locally we should stay on the Northwest side of the storm system, keeping the tornado impact near 2% or less.  In this morning’s graphics we have included a breakdown of impacts by county. This is our first forecast and you should know that some minor adjustments could be needed. Overall the heaviest rainfall today and Wednesday will be along the Southeast and east facing slopes of the Blue Ridge. Michaels most impactful rainfall totals will arrive on Thursday over Cleveland, Lincoln and Catawba Counties.  We will fine tune this forecast every 12 hours until the storm hits.

By far over our area this isn’t a storm where you need to panic over but isolated to widely scattered power outages are likely. Winds could gust to 35 mph over most of the viewing area while elevations above 3000ft could see 55mph gusts. Wet soil conditions coupled with 35mph gusts can bring down several trees and powerlines.  Make sure you have emergency kits and plans ready just in case. 

The threat for flash flooding with Michael is actually the greatest in Cleveland and Lincoln Counties and points East right now. If you live in any of our 8 county coverage area it wouldn’t be a bad plan to have a flood plan in place, just in case Michael tries to pull the wool over our eyes and jog 25-50miles West. 

The good news is though that fall arrives on the back side of this front once it and Michael move East.

For the latest monitor our website, social media, and The National Weather Service. 

 

 

Monday Evening 2.3 Version Update; Hurricane Michael Strengthens. Heavy Rain and Gusty Winds To Affect Western NC Foothills Later This Week.

Good Monday Evening. Impacts to Western North Carolina have come up just a little bit as Michael has trended west in the models today. The new Hurricane Center Track takes the storm pretty much up I-85. This keeps our area on the Northwest side though so the tornado threat will remain low. However prolonged Southeast flow from Tuesday Night through Thursday Night will likely yield some flash flooding across Western North Carolina. At this time no change with the rainfall total forecast though.

11 AM Hurricane Michael Update

11 AM Update on now Hurricane Michael.



Micheal is now a Category 1 Hurricane situated 50 miles south of the Western tip of Cuba.



Michael is projected to move into the Gulf of Mexico tonight and continue to strengthen as it moves towards the Big Bend area of Florida.



The National Hurricane Center has Michael striking the Big Bend are of Florida as a Category 3 Hurricane Wednesday afternoon/evening.


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2018-10-08_11-02-38.jpg






Closer to home, we could see a fetch of moisture develop on Wednesday over the area giving us some tropical downpours.




By Thursday, the eventual track of Michael will determine the impacts we will see. The current thinking is Western North Carolina will be on the Western side of Michael limiting major impacts. If the track was to shift westward over the next few days we could see impacts increase, or a more eastward track would lessen the impacts slightly.




Central and Eastern North Carolina, along with Central and Eastern South Carolina look to be on the east side of the track and would bring torrential rainfall, gusty winds, tornadoes and storm surge to the area.




The good thing about Michael is, it is a progressive storm. This means it will be in an out in a matter of a day.




Western NC/ Upstate of SC

Flash Flooding/ Landslide main concern.

3-4" of rain with locally higher amounts.

30-40 mph wind gust.




Central, Eastern NC / Central and Eastern SC

Flash Flooding, Damaging winds, Tornadoes and Storm Surge Concerns.

4-5" of rain

45-55 mph wind gust

isolated tornadoes

storm surge issues along coast.






The track and timing is still being worked on as we monitor a cold front to our West and the Atlantic High Pressure off the Carolina Coastline.

Tropical Storm Michael High Impact Briefing (Monday October 8th, 9 am)

Submitted by: Daniel Crawley


Good Monday morning, we continue to monitor Tropical Storm Michael located in the Yucatan Channel. Michael has intensified overnight becoming a 70 mph tropical storm. Michael will likely become a hurricane later today…


Here’s a look at some of the latest info in regards to the storm…another briefing will be posted by this evening.








Michael Update 2.0. Key Message: Don't Fixate Your Eyes On Michael Alone As Moisture Moves In Tuesday Not Assocated With Michael

2:00am -  Monday Morning

Chief Meteorologist Chris White

A lot of things taking shape over the next week, one of the two biggest is Michael’s potential impact on our area.  The second will be the first taste of fall weather behind Michael.  The main thing to remember with this forecast is this is not Florence from three weeks ago.  This is a different storm, different overall setup, different trajectory, different strength, different everything.

Michael is a strengthening tropical storm tonight as it approaches the Yucatan Straight.  Pressure is down to 997mb and falling.  I like to describe the atmosphere using the earth surface.  High pressure is a mountain.  Low pressure is a valley often times filled with a body of water like a river or lake.  Air moves from high pressure to low pressure.  Say we were playing basket ball on a hill.  If the ball gets away from us where does it go?  The ball rolls downhill.  That is a good way to remember how air in the atmosphere moves.  So lets call Michael the basketball.  Michael is going to move in the direction of least resistance.

Lets look at all the moving parts. 

 Atmosphere setup as of 1am Monday Morning

Atmosphere setup as of 1am Monday Morning

The upper level ridge of high pressure over the Atlantic has been a huge game player in our weather for the last several weeks.  Clockwise flow around high pressure has been a game player for these nighttime rain events.  It has pulled tropical air into the region and you have felt that very humid airmass.  The high has been so strong though that since Florence, areas out side of the mountains have been largely dry.  Air hasn’t been able to rise until it gets lifted up over the mountains.  There can be all the moisture in the world available but unless there is something to force the air upward (lift), clear skies and dry condtions prevail.  Over the last three weeks since Florence the eastern slope of the mountains have been inundated with showers and storms that sit, and do not move, largely because of this counterclockwise flow. 

The jet stream (indicated with yellow line) is finally going to make a move into our area.  Cool high pressure will build into the region behind the cold front that will push through the area behind Michael.  See the trough over the West?  Its been locked there.  The cold front is developing near Alberta Canada and will drop south and East over the next two days.  This will carve a trough (valley) out in the atmosphere over the center of the country.  That trough will move the cold front East.  Lets brake this down into 4 quick questions and answers. 

Questions on the table:

1) How quick does the upper high ridge (atmospheric mountain) weaken and move East?

2) How quick does the trough and associated cold front (valley/weakness) move East?

3) How quick does that trough pick up Michael and advance it North and East?

4) Will Michael’s winds become elongated along the frontal boundary, keeping winds higher as it progresses through the Carolina’s?

Again, Michael has to find a weakness (trough/valley) in the atmosphere before it can advance North and East. 

Answering questions on the table:

1) Models indicate the high pressure ridge moving East and weakening by Wednesday Morning. 

2) This should allow the advancing trough and cold front to move into and through the area Wednesday Night and Thursday.

3) After Michael finds that trough it will pick up forward speed racing NNE.  This should allow Michael to maintain tropical storm status until moving back off shore somewhere between NC and VA Sometime Thursday. 

4)  Michael’s winds will not likely have a lot of impact over Western NC but the gradient winds could still cause gusts to 30mph.  Along and East of Charlotte, through Eastern NC sustained winds over 50 mph for 6-12 hours appear reasonable.  The one saving grace with Michael is that it should be quick and progressive unlike Florence was.  That will hopefully minimize the higher rainfall totals.  Tuesday Morning we will start to narrow down impacts by county for all of our 8 county forecast area.

***BUT WAIT THERE IS MORE***

One thing to watch is this area of disturbed weather that is sandwiched between the ridge of high pressure and Michael. It is currently North of Puerto Rico and moving WNW around that ridge.  That area of disturbed weather will arrive over our area Tuesday Night into Wednesday well ahead of any Michael impacts.  Upslope flow rainfall should begin Tuesday  and overspread the entire forecast area Tuesday Night into Wednesday Morning.  In fact models produce widespread showers and storms this afternoon. Some of these may cluster and organize along the Blue Ridge. Rain rates today will be around 1.4 inches per hour but models indicate rain rates will rise to nearly 2 inches per hour by Tuesday Night.  With the antecedent soil moisture along the immediate east slope of the Blue Ridge in Burke, Caldwell, McDowell, and Rutherford much above normal already, rain rates of this magnitude could mean localized flash flooding Tuesday and Wednesday ahead of Michael. Then if Michael does move closer to the forecast area in the western side of the cone of uncertainty a significant flash flood threat could develop Thursday.  Fine details remain to be worked on out past three days.

HERE ARE THE GRAPHICS FOR EARLY MORNING FOR HIGH IMPACT WEATHER BRIEFING 2.0. VERSION 2.1 WILL BE UPDATED LATER THIS MORNING BY DAY SHIFT.

Sunday Morning Weather Briefing. Michael To Impact Us Mid Week

11:45am Chris White-Chief Meteorologist 

Good Sunday Morning. After a night of heavy rainfall across the area the sun is out with partly cloudy skies this morning. Most areas in upslope flow saw rainfall overnight.  The most fell in McDowell County where Southerly flow led to the Catawba River near Pleasant Gardens cresting above 6 ft for the second time in a week. Radar estimates nearly 4 inches of rain fell around Batcave.  Heavy rain also fell over the Linville Gorge causing the Linville River to crest at just over 2ft. 

IMG_1057.GIF

CoCoRaHs Rain Gauge Network ending 7am this morning. 

 Rainfall from overnight on Automated gauges. If blank no rain fell. 

Rainfall from overnight on Automated gauges. If blank no rain fell. 

Going forward this will likely be a recurring theme this week. Upslope flow will kick in again tonight producing localized rain events along the Eastern slopes. This activity will become more widespread ahead of Michael. Tuesday night into Wednesday the activity will be widespread and likely will extend well east of the Blue Ridge as SE flow strengthens. 

By Wednesday Afternoon Michael will be nearing landfall somewhere between Mississippi and Florida. I have to point out this IS NOT Florence. The impacts will be different. A cold front will be sweeping South and the front will pick Michael up,and Michael will accelerate North and East. The trend is to keep the highest impacts from Columbia to Charlotte and Eastern NC and Eastern SC. However, torrential rainfall will impact our area Tuesday through Thursday likely leading to at least isolated flash flooding. This is something we will monitor and our first high impact weather briefing will come tonight.

The good news is Fall will finally arrive by late week. Temps will drop into the 40’s for overnight lows late week into next weekend and highs will only make it into the 70’s.  Great news. 

 

Full write up on Michael and our first High Impact Weather Briefing tonight. 

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August in October: No sign of fall-like weather in the works...

Submitted by: Daniel Crawley


Good  Monday evening…October has arrived but only in terms of the calendar.

 

 

The Eastern half of the United States is stuck in a pattern that features weather that will be much warmer than what you should expect as we now enter the heart of the fall season. Temperatures today jumped up into the 80’s across Western North Carolina and we look to get even warmer as the week progresses.

 

Why is this happening? It has everything to do with what is going on at the mid and upper levels of the atmosphere. High pressure continues to be very dominant across the Eastern US and that is bottling up any cold back into the Rockies and into Canada. And from all indications we see very little change in that pattern for the rest of this week and into next week.

 

As you can see on the 500mb charts through the next two weeks, higher heights will be centered over New England while lower height will be from the Four Corners Region up into the Rockies.

 


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The one caveat for our part of the world is that the easterly flow at times can involve some influx of moisture leading to periods of cloudy and unsettled weather in-between times of warm and humid conditions. Temperatures at this time of the year average in the upper 70’s during the day with upper 50’s night…our region is going to remain a good 5-10+ degrees above the norm.

 

The Climate Prediction Center in the 6-10 Day range pretty much falls in line with the current model thinking…

 

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And today’s released monthly forecast from the CPC generally shows a warmer than normal October for the Southeast US.

 

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So for all lovers of the fall season patience will need to be required at least through the first half of the month…but at some point you have to think that big changes are in the works leading up to the second half of the fall season.

 

One of the big impacts from this continued warm weather (especially at night) has been a lack of fall color in the mountains. Just now at the highest elevations we are seeing hints of color change. The Southern Appalachian Region is already a good two weeks behind schedule on the fall leaf season.





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50/50 Weather Weekend: Enjoy the sun today, clouds will increase leading to less then stellar Sunday

Submitted by: Daniel Crawley


Good Saturday afternoon to everyone, we have a 50/50 weekend on tap across the Western Carolinas…

 

 

Looking at the surface features this afternoon you can see a lot of what’s going on a regional scale. The boundary that brought showers and thunderstorms for most of this week has slid to our south into the South Carolina Low Country and back to the southwest to the Gulf Coast Region. At the jet stream level southwest flow remains in place and high clouds from that will filter through the region over the next 24-48 hours.

 

At the surface across North Carolina, being north of the frontal boundary light winds are in place at this time and the left over surface moisture is not being scoured out. That has a lot to do with the mix of sun and clouds across the region today…there just is no feature out there to completely dry out the atmosphere…

 

 

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As we get into tonight, change will be taking place, high pressure is sliding across the Upper Midwest and will be centered over Western Pennsylvania by late tonight. This is going to shift winds at the surface from variable to more of a northeast flow…and if you have lived in this part of the world for any time, northeast winds usually yields an increase in clouds and moisture. And sure enough after sunset tonight expect a pretty quick increase in clouds locally.

 

 

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By tomorrow morning, northeast flow will be dominant across the Carolinas, this is going to result in a cooler and cloudy Sunday with some light precipitation (drizzle) in upslope locations. Daytime temperatures will remain in the 70’s all day tomorrow, probably going to be one of those days to remain inside and get those house chores done…

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Wednesday Weather Briefing: Weather battleground setting up for second half of the week...

Submitted by: Daniel Crawley


Good Wednesday morning to everyone, the weather pattern is becoming active once again across the Carolinas. After dealing with several warm and sunny days post-Florence, the clouds have returned in a big way so far this week and most locations has received a bit of rainfall. That will continue for today and if anything will begin to pick up here for the second half of the work week…

 

 

Water vapor imagery shows a nice trough that is moving through the northern tier of the country. Meanwhile high pressure is slowly giving way across the Southeast US, it is all setting up a battle ground between each feature with southwest flow providing a good moisture tap in the mid and upper levels. Meanwhile southerly winds at the surface will saturate the lower levels.

 


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This battle ground appears to be locking in for today and lasting through the end of the work week and into the upcoming weekend. A couple days ago it appeared that the region may get a good push of cooler and less humid into the region but that has changed at bit. The Southeast ridge is going to remain stubborn and will not give up its ground without a fight. As you can see on the upper level charts, the ridge continues to take a southwest to northeast configuration, much like a kidney bean shape. This is a classic fall look at the upper levels across the Eastern US. This in configuration with slow moving surface boundary will provide a trigger for showers and thunderstorms in several waves. The heaviest action looks to begin later today and last through Thursday and into Friday…possibly impacting High School Football games on Friday night.

 


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It’s not until Saturday that our ridge will finally begin to flatten just enough to where some drier air may filter into the state of North Carolina. As you can see on the Saturday upper level charts the southwest flow veers more to a west and west-northwest flow…

 

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Coming back to the short term, the short range models are picking up on increased rain chances starting this afternoon and lasting through Thursday. This by no means will be an all-day rainfall, but instead periods of rain shower activity. A few rumbles of thunder also possible with this boundary.

 


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The periods of rainfall again will persist beyond Thursday morning, it may not be until Saturday before parts of the coverage area may dry out.

 

This should give most everyone a solid chances at getting rainfall totals in the 1 – 1.5 inch range through Saturday…

 

Have a great Wednesday!

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Sunday Briefing: Florence finally begins to move toward Western Carolinas, flood theat still exists...

Submitted by: Daniel Crawley (@SoApps1979)

 

Good Sunday morning to everyone across the region, we continue to monitor what is left of Florence as it is finally showing signs of forward movement toward our region. This forecast over the past several days has been very fluid to say the least. Florence has thrown forecasters a few curve balls along the way…

 

 

Recent meso-analysis indicates that Florence was located near Orangeburg South Carolina as of 2 am this morning and moving off to the west-northwest at 6 mph, which is the fastest it has moved since late Friday night.

 


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Sateliite and water vapor shows that Florence continues to hold a decent structure considering it has been inland for close to 48 hours at this point. One reason it has held intact is because of high pressure overhead giving the storm good ventilation in the upper levels to the north and east sides of the storm. If this feature was still out over water, we would likely be talking an intensifying storm. Also, Florence continues to have a strong inflow from the Atlantic, today the storm will lose some of that direct moisture inflow but moisture should continue be very plentiful to produce widespread precipitation all day long, heavy at times.

 


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The rainfall which has filled in quite a bit since last Saturday evening will continue to do so on Sunday morning. Rainfall rates (1/2 in per hour) while not very intense right now will get stronger as we go through the day

 

 

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The peak of intensity in precip may begin around noon and could last for a 3 of 4 hour window where rates could run at 1-2 inches per hour. The exact placement of this feeder band will largely determine the locations to receive the heaviest rainfall. The surface low will be roughly to the west of Newberry South Carolina as this juncture, that will result in easterly surface which will begin to provide upslope in our favored locations in the foothills.

 


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By late afternoon, the low pressure will be located near where the North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia state lines meet. Surface flow will be veering to southeast at this point keeping the rainfall at a steady rate. Plus our feeder line of moisture from the Atlantic will continue to impact our northern tier.

 


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Right now we continue to forecast the potential of excessive rainfall through early Monday as amounts could range up to six inches (storm total), however any of the feeder bands that develop could result in local higher amounts. Upslope flow into the higher terrain will also provide elevated rainfall amounts. This should result in flash flooding later today in several local areas…

 

 

In summary here are the key points for today’s weather as Florence will provide its biggest impacts to the Western Carolinas today…the entire weather team will be monitoring the latest with Florence and will have continuous updates here at our website and on social media.

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